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Cinemagoers rant over couple seat ban

Writer: Florey DM


"No unwed couples for loveseats!" says LFS Seri Iskandar.

22 Jul – A ban that prevents unwed couples from purchasing tickets for the loveseats, or couple seats, at one of the cinemas in Perak has ruffled some feathers after the issue came to light recently.

Only married couples are allowed to patronise the couple seats at LFS Seri Iskandar, though the ban applies to Muslim couples only, who are required to show "proof of marriage".

Family members such as father and son, mother and daughter or siblings who would like to sit together can purchase the seats, though there haven't been such circumstances at the outlet yet.

The 7-screen cinema has a total of 39 couple seats. Before the screening starts, the ushers will reportedly check the seats and patrons who do not have valid tickets will be asked to move from the couple seats to the regular seats.


A notice of the ban (Photo source: Sin Chew Daily).

The cinema is a hotspot for the younger crowd as it is located near a university, hence the implementation of the ban in order to curb any immoral acts in the semi-dark cinema halls.

The ban has been in place since the cinema opened its doors to the public back in December 2013.
 
It is learnt that the cinema was following the order issued by the Perak Tengah district council on 26 September 2013 to display the ban notice, since the cinema is also located in a predominantly Muslim community.

LFS Cinemas was contacted for clarification but no comments were received.

It was noted that no complaints have been made about it before but now that the issue is out in the open, several disgruntled cinemagoers have taken to social media to voice their dissatisfactions.

"Even without couple seats, immoral acts can be carried out in the car or outdoors," said one Facebook user, a view shared by many others, while another raised the question, "Why are we only talking about this now, in 2015?"

Several other comments include

"This feels like a backward move for a developing country."

"It is not the cinema's right or duty to ask for a proof of marriage. They are not religious officers. Does this mean that hotels can also do the same now?"

"First mamak restaurants and now cinemas join the list of places to blame for inappropriate behaviour!"


Cinema Online, 22 July 2015

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